All posts by reclickphoto

We are moving!

Firstly let me thank you all for dropping by The ReClick Photo blog over the past year. I really appreciate the fact that you took the time to do so, and I hope you enjoyed all of the blog posts that I have wrote. As you may have been aware here at ReClick Photo over the past few week there has been talk of many changes that are going to be made in order to make ReClick Photos website and social media profiles better, much more accessible, so you can have a better customer experience with us.

 One of the major changes was a totally redesigned website which showcases some of our existing features as well as a few new ones. I have made the decision to intregate fully the ReClick Photo blog in our new website making it a more of a feature so it can be easily accessed straight from our homepage. To do so I have migrated all the previous blog entries from here on WordPress to its new home on http://www.reclickphoto.co.uk. So I’m afraid from today all new blog entries from me at ReClick photo will not feature here but will be available on our new blog on our website. So please if you have been following us on here, or if you have bookmarked or favourited us on your internet browser, you will have to update them. I am so sorry for any inconvenience this may cause, but I am sure when you visit our blogs new home you will agree that by moving there it will make a great deal of difference as it helps enhance ReClick Photos brand new website, and the services we provide. 

Many thanks and I look forward to hearing about what you think of ReClick Photos new internet home.

Hugh at ReClick Photo.

http://www.reclickphoto.co.uk

#PhotoFriday: The Glorious Dead at Peace.

It’s #PhotoFriday! Today’s image, “The Glorious Dead at Peace” features Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, France.

cemetery, graveyrad, World War 1, First World War, France, Somme, Lest We Forget, history, Historic site, landscape, photography,
The Glorious Dead at Peace

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery is located just west of Longueval, France. In the autumn of 1918 a small cemetery was created at this site containing 25 graves. It was not until after the Armistice in November 1918 that this cemetery was greatly enlarged to accommodate the graves of more than 5,500 officers and men who where brought from the battlefields of the Somme and from other smaller cemeteries to be interred here. The memorial and the cemetery was designed by the architect Sir Herbert Baker.

Lest we Forget

Hugh at ReClick Photo.

#PhotoFriday: Anyone for Cake?

Happy #PhotoFriday everyone! To celebrate the return of one of Britian’s most loved to Programmes, The Great British Bake Off, I thought that it would be fitting to have a culinary inspired image for this weeks image.

baking, great british bake off, afternoon tea, china, tea set, tea service,
Anyone for Cake?

A cup of tea and a biscuit or slice of cake is integral to our national identity. Like all our different counties and varying accents what we enjoy with a cup of tea or coffee varies from place to place. Not only does this custom ease our hunger in between meal times, it is a source of comfort after a difficult day, or during a sad time. It serves as a token of hospitally as people visit your home, often this is when the nice cups, and more expensive biscuits make an appearance. Sometimes if time persists before hand a little home-baking is done in advance to show that a conscious effort has been made for a guests arrival. So whether is a quick cup of tea and a rich tea busicuit out a packet, or a cappuccino and a large slice of carrot cake from your favourite coffee shop, taking a short break from your day to enjoy something nice is never a bad thing.

Thanks for reading.

Hugh at ReClick Photo.

#PhotoFriday: The St. Julien Canadian Memorial.

Happy #PhotoFriday everyone! To join with others all over the world, here is my contribution to #WorldPhotoDay – The St. Julian Canadian Memorial, Ypres.
memorial, Canada, First World War, Frederick Chapman Clemesha, design, belgium, battlefield, brooding soldier, Ypres, Europe, history,
St. Julien Canadian Memorial, Ypres.
 
After the First World War, The Imperial War Graves Commission made available 8 sites to Canada to build memorials. The Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission was established to facilitate the competition which was held to find a design which would become the national memorial.
 
In 1922 the entry by Walter Seymour Allward was announced as the winner. Allward’s design would be later erected at Vimy Ridge, France (you can read more about my visit to this memorial here. The runner-up was the design submitted by Frederick Chapman Clemesha which you see in today’s photograph. Also known as the “Brooding Soldier,” Clemesha’s design was built at St Julien, Belgium.
 
During the First World War this location was known a Vancouver Corner, as the Canadian First Division was assigned here during the Second Battle of Ypres. On the 22nd April 1915 the German Army unleashed 168 tons of Chlorine gas from their position opposite Langemark-Poelkapelle, in the north of Ypres. This was first poison gas attack on the Western Front.
 
This striking granite memorial, which stands at 11 metres (35ft) tall, can be seen from miles around. The bowed head of the Canadian solider at the top of it stands as a powerful symbol of remembrance. On the memorial is a small plaque which reads:
 
“THIS COLUMN MARKS THE BATTLEFIELD WHERE 18,000 CANADIANS ON THE BRITISH LEFT WITHSTOOD THE FIRST GERMAN GAS ATTACKS THE 22-24 APRIL 1915 2,000 FELL AND LIE BURIED NEARBY.”
 
Standing in front of the memorial surrounded by its beautifully kept grounds, you cannot help but take a moment to stop and think of what horror faced those brave men during April 1915. Like so many locations we visited during my trip to Belgium and France earlier this year, this site at St. Julien brings home to me the importance of remembrance, what happened should never be forgotten and it is up to us to keep the memory of of those brave men, and what they fought for alive.
 
Lest We Forget.
 
Hugh at ReClick Photo.

#PhotoFriday: The Menin Gate.

Happy #PhotoFriday everyone!

This week’s image is of the Menin gate, Ypres, Belgium. This magnificent structure is dedicated to the British and commonwealth soldiers who were killed during the First World War, and still to this day are missing in the Ypres Salient.

Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium, Europe, Architecture, Architectural phototography, photography, history, First World War, Landmark, Visitor attraction,
The Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium.

Once completed, the gate appeared to be not large enough to contain all the names as originally planned. It was then decided by the Commonwealth Graves commission that the 54,395 names of those who had died before 15th August 1917 would be inscribed on stone panels of the Hall of Memory within the Menin Gate. The remaining 34,984 names of those who were killed and are still are missing would be commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing instead.

In an act of gratitude to the brave soldiers who fought for the freedom of Belgium during the First World War, every night at 8pm buglers from the local fire brigade close the road which passes through the memorial and sounds the “Last Post.” With the exception of the German occupation during the Second World War, this evening ceremony has been carried out each night since the 2nd of July 1928.

When visiting Ypres earlier in the year, I had the privilege to witness this ceremony for myself. Standing alongside hundreds of people within the Hall of Memory surrounded by all the names of the missing etched onto the walls, knowing that the ground I stood on was were hundreds of thousands of brave men made their way to the front line, was a very overwhelming experience.  Even now, recalling it now as I write this makes me emotional. The dignity, gratitude and honour shown to all those who fought all that time ago was extremely poignant and humbling.  The memory of the night will live with me the rest of my life.

Lest We Forget

Thanks for reading

Hugh at ReClick Photo.

#Changeiscoming

Hey everyone! Hope you are all having a great Tuesday! Just to let you know that over the next couple of days we are going to be scaling back social media profiles. There are many various platforms out there and with growing time restraints we have decided to scale back slightly and concentrate on updating fewer of our social media profiles more regularly.

ReClick Photo profiles which will be retired are:

Google+
Tumblr
Path.

We will be formulating a regular posting schedule so you will know where and when new updates and content will be added.

This is the start of some exciting changes here at ReClick Photo so please look out for further updates over the next couple of weeks!

‪#‎changeiscoming‬

Thanks

Hugh at ReClick Photo.