Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography

The Midland Hotel Revisited: Behind The Scenes

Welcome to today’s second post about the iconic Art Deco Midland Hotel Morecambe. I hope you enjoyed looking at the images in my first, The Midland Hotel Revisited – An Exhibition in Monochrome just as much as I did taking them. Here I will share with you the original images as the were shot, and tell you about the behind-the-scenes process behind getting the images ready for posting.

Let’s starts with the first image.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography
View of the The Midland Hotel before retouching.

As you can see there are few distracting objects in this image that could do with being addressed. Here is list of the work I carried out:

  1. Removal of the:
  • Cracks on the render on the boundary walls
  • Lamp post on the right
  • Sign post on the left
  • Birds flying in the sky
  • Black car on the left
  • Red and white plastic barrier
  • Signs at the pillars
  • Bollard in the middle of the road

2. Desaturated the image then adjusted the various levels including brightness/contrast, curves, sharpness, etc.

Now we have a finished image. Let’s take a look.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography mononchrome
Front facade of the Midland Hotel Morecambe.

Although it is tricky to remove the signpost and street lamp, it is definitely worth the effort. Now you can appreciate the facade in all its glory.  Let’s take a look at the next image.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography
View of the Midland Hotel from the left

Like the image above, there are few things that could do with being changed in order to make it a better image. let’s take a look at what I did:

  1. Removed of the seagulls
  2. Cropped the image slightly
  3. Retouched the blemished in the render of the wall to the left
  4. Desaturated the image and adjusted various levels including curves, exposure etc.

Let’s take a look at the finished image.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography mononchrome
Front facade of the Midland Hotel from the left.

I believe that seeing the image in black and white helps you focus on the hotel itself. The cars are no longer a distraction as their colour has been stripped away. Now we can move on to the image of the hotel’s entrance pillars.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography
View of the Midland Hotel’s entrance gateposts before retouching.

As you can see here the pillars are getting lost within the image. My main objective here is to make sure that they are the main focus. with so many things to do here its hard to know where to start. here are the things I had to do to achieve the finished image:

  1. Removed the private parking signs, and AA sign.
  2. Reinstated the grill running between the pillars.
  3. Removed the orange barrier and retouched the side of the blue car.
  4. Removed the security cameras, and the fun fair from the background.
  5. Retouched the render on the walls and the pavement and slope leading into the car park.
  6. Cropped the image.
  7. Desaturated the image and altered various levels such as exposure, brightness/contrast etc.
Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography mononchrome
The entrance pillars of the Midland Hotel Morecambe.

A feature like these pillars should be celebrated and now with this retouched image I believe they are. Like the previous image by removing the colour the pillars are now the main focus as the cars are not as much as a distraction as they were. Let’s now turn to the images taken from the rear of the building.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography
Rear facade of the Midland hotel from the right before retouching.

Compared to other images in this post, you will see that there is not much that needs to be altered. But what is done makes a world of difference. Here are the steps I took:

  1. Removed the seagulls from the sky.
  2. Cropped the image.
  3. Desaturated the image and adjust various level such as brightness/contrast, exposure etc.
Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography mononchrome
The Midland Hotel Morecambe rear facade or the right.

Now in black and white you appreciate the architectural features of the building even more. let’s take a look at an image take from the other side of this facade.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography
The Midland Hotel from the rear showing the cafe before retouching.

As you can see with this image, like the one before, it does not need a lot of retouching but with a few small tweeks the image can be greatly improved. Here are the steps I took:

  1. Retouched the pavement, removing some of the blemishes.
  2. Removed the bird in flight.
  3. Cropped the image.
  4. Desaturated the image and adjusted various level such as brightness/contrast, exposure etc.
Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography mononchrome
The Midland Hotel rear facade from the left.

Out of all the images of the Midland Hotel I took that day, this is my favourite. Now in black and white its architectural features really stand out. Finally we will move on to the last image of the shoot.

Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography
View of the Midland Hotel taken from the pier before retouching

Like the previous two images this last one requires little change. What is done, I’m my opinion , make a great difference. This is what I did:

  1. Retouched some on the blemishes on the pavement
  2. Desaturated the image and adjusted various level such as brightness/contrast, exposure etc.
Midland hotel Morecambe Art Deco Lancashire England architecture photography mononchrome
View of the Midland Hotel from the Pier.

Now you can see the architectural form of this building at its very best. By changing the image to black and white you can see the hotel in all its glory.

From the outset I had decided that I wanted black and white images for this project, as I have mentioned earlier,it accentuates the buildings form plus it echoes the original photos of the hotel when it first opened in the 1930’s. I wanted to show in this post how sometimes taking the photograph is just the start of creating a beautiful image.

If you have any images like the ones you see above and want to give them the ReClick Photo treatment, then please contact me at info@reclickphoto.co.uk or you can visit http://www.reclickphoto.co.uk for more information.

Thanks for reading!

Hugh at ReClick Photo.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s